“Out, out, out Brief Candle”

This soliloquy offers the audience his view on the meaninglessness of life. In the first few lines, Macbeth realizes that his wife’s death is related to how their desire for power ultimately corrupted them as human beings. In context, Macbeth already identified his tragic flaw, which is his desire for power, but chose to pursue his own “way to dusty death” and therefore choose to keep fighting not for his life, but for his own morals, no matter how corrupt they appear to be. Macbeth expresses no grief or sadness over his wife’s death since he knew that this would eventually happen. His apathy indicates how he views life, in general, as nothing “but a walking shadow, a poor player”, who will eventually be “heard no more”. Thus, this “brief candle”, or his dimming glow of candlelight, will soon be extinguished by his own appetite for power.

This clip offers a more modern depiction of Macbeth’s soliloquy:

 

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This entry was posted in AP Mindset, Honors English III, Shakespeare. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to “Out, out, out Brief Candle”

  1. jillianhaywood says:

    The second sentence is very important as it ties in the theme of power and how it relates Macbeth’s realizations of corruption upon Lady Macbeth’s death.

  2. dennysmythe says:

    Patrick explains Macbeth’s tragic flaw and how it relates to Shakespeares choice to convey a message about choosing morals over power and what it will lead to eventually as a result. “In context, Macbeth already identified his tragic flaw, which is his desire for power, but chose to pursue his own “way to dusty death” and therefore choose to keep fighting not for his life, but for his own morals, no matter how corrupt they appear to be.”

  3. Beanie O'Shea says:

    The final sentence in this post sums up nicely the unfortunate reality for Hamlet in a poetic analysis of this pungent line.

  4. sagemaggi says:

    The last sentence of the poem has a great connection from Macbeth’s power steak to his wife’s death, identifying that they both are short lived and will come to an end.

  5. pistolpete42 says:

    Patrick acknowledges that Macbeth understood his flaw as a character but continued on the path to ruin. This is significant in the play because the audience can then depict the thoughts of Macbeth with reasoning.

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