Hamlet’s Turning Point: “How all occasions do inform against me”

Hamlet’s soliloquy in Act Four Scene Four serves as a major turning point in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. In this speech, Hamlet expresses his frustration with his inability to kill Claudius while comparing himself to Fortinbras, the impulsive prince of Norway. At this moment in the play, Hamlet’s character changes greatly, as he commits to taking direct action and killing Claudius at his next opportunity. This soliloquy is essential to the greater meaning of the play because it provides a major change in Hamlet’s character that will ultimately lead to the conclusion and achievement of Hamlet’s goals. Shakespeare enhances Hamlet’s speech and the emotions it conveys by including several poetic and literary devices. A foil is one of the most vital elements, as it is elucidates the differences between Hamlet and Fortinbras and explains Hamlet’s decision to become more like his foil. In addition, Shakespeare uses several metaphors including the comparison between a man and a beast as well as the comparison between the Fortinbras’ invasion and an eggshell. This passage is extremely powerful because it uses these devices to shows Hamlet’s true anger and frustration while also serving as a turning point in the play.

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3 Responses to Hamlet’s Turning Point: “How all occasions do inform against me”

  1. dennysmythe says:

    Jillian describes the importance of foiling in Shakespeares works and how he uses it effectively to portray Hamlet’s character. “A foil is one of the most vital elements, as it is elucidates the differences between Hamlet and Fortinbras and explains Hamlet’s decision to become more like his foil.”

  2. Beanie O'Shea says:

    The most telling sentence in this post is the fourth as it allows the reader not only to picture the present of Hamlet but to understand the future as well.

  3. sagemaggi says:

    The third sentence explains the transition between the anxiety that Hamlet felt about committing murder to his plan of action very well.

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