Similarities between Huckleberry Finn and The Rocky Mountains, Lander’s Peak

Albert_Bierstadt_-_The_Rocky_Mountains,_Lander's_Peak

The painting The Rocky Mountains, Lander’s Peak by Albert Bierstadt is similar to the book Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain.  Both works use elements of romanticism.  A big part of romanticism is an appreciation for nature.  Bierstadt’s painting shows a beautiful detailed nature scene with huge mountains in the background and in the foreground there is a lake and a field with Native Americans.  Huckleberry Finn takes place mostly out in the wilderness and on the Mississippi River.  The painting also reminds me of the book because the scene depicted in it potentially resembles something the Huck and Jim might have seen on their journey.  Huck is very adventurous and likes to be dramatic, and this scene is also very adventurous and dramatic, with the giant majestic mountains in the back.  Also, the front of the painting is an ordinary Native American settlement with teepees, horses, and the Natives, but in the back it is an extraordinary example of nature.  This is similar to Huck, who to most looks like and average adventurous, mischievous boy, but when examined, he is exposed as a very complicated person.  There are issues that he has dealt with that many people would not guess, such as his whole experience and relationship with Pap, the whole issue with the large sum of money that was his, his experiences with African Americans, and dealing with being on the run.  Both works appear simple and average, but it is not tough to realize that they are actually complex and detailed.

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