Anne Hutchinson’s Impact on the American Character & Experience

annehutchinson_jpg-ABI think American literary critics should know about Anne Hutchinson and her accomplishments, taking them into consideration before coming up with a larger vision of the American character or experience. Anne Hutchinson was one of the early colonists of the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Colonies. She was an extremely well educated Puritan woman with a strong interest in theology.
She developed her own interpretations of the Bible and wanted to share her views with others. However, Puritans viewed women as inferior to them and morally feeble. Through a Women’s group she started holding meetings in her own home. She discussed scriptures, prayed, reviewed sermons and expressed her own views. These meetings were seen as a threat to the authority of the men in power and were against the fundamental ideals of the Puritan ways of life. She believed that only faith was necessary for salvation instead of good works, and she believed that God would reveal himself to people, without the clergy’s aid. She was found guilty of heresy in 1637, was banished from Boston, and fled to the Rhode Island Colony. Anne Hutchinson pioneered the ideas of civil liberty and religious freedom, which were later written into the US Constitution. Hence, she played a huge role in history, because her ideas later became one of the core values of the American character and experience.

Sources:

http://www.history.com/topics/anne-hutchinson
http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h577.html
http://www.pbs.org/godinamerica/people/anne-hutchinson.html

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