Best Practices for Effective Blog Posts & Peer Review

another-look-at-blog-post-1Part One: As we refine our prose and check our sources, we should also be mindful that we are trying to create “sharable” content with our classmates as well as others who care about our content. We should be aware that we are trying to create a “Flat” classroom and have everyone in our class see what we are learning and how we are learning it.

Does this image help you revise all the parts and nuances of a successful blog post? Click on the source link to learn more from the Langwitches website, a most helpful source for our #flatclassroom. Then, once you have created an excellent post, let’s have individual students turn to Twitter and, being mindful of audience(s), compose an academic Tweet to to share what we learn and show how we did it. Look through the “following” category and find an academic asset who is an expert on your topic. If you find other experts, let us know so that we can add them to our academic network.

Source: http://langwitches.org/blog/2012/11/27/student-blogs-learning-to-write-in-digital-spaces/

peerreviewPart Two: One of the most essential parts of building a positive and productive atmosphere for learning in any classroom is sharing what you learn. Another is giving and receiving useful feedback. With that in mind, we must give feedback on each other’s work in a useful and kind way (remember the class motto?). Please be an active agent in creating a more positive and productive learning environment.

We’ll follow these these PQP steps when we comment on each other’s blog posts. To start, let’s have everyone make at least one sentence for praising the post, one sentence for poising a question about the post, and one sentence for suggesting how to polish the ideas in the overall post (which include text and complementing media). Feel free to write more than this amount. Also be mindful that a good blog post has media the complements the prose and the proper categories and tags are selected (and “uncategorized” is de-selected). Most importantly, compose your comments in Standard English. Stay positive!

Some links for more learning on the topic: http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/peer-review-narrative-122.html

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About bsullivan35

I am an English teacher working with great students at an independent school in Ct.
This entry was posted in Best Practices for Blogging, Colonial History Fall 2016, English III, PQP: Praise, Question, Polish and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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