Ann Hutchinson Making History vs. John Winthrop Dictating

I thought it was quite ironic that John Winthrop created this small group of Puritans that would make the catholic religion “pure” like it should be and not controlled.  Ann Hutchinson is of the same religion but is put on trial for sedition for telling people that she believes god is speaking to us and not through the bible which we then read. She is put on trial for “disrupting the peace and common wealth of the churches” (PBS) in Providence. I thought this was interesting that they would banish her and her family when she believed in god just as they did but with minor differences from the traditional beliefs of Puritans. The Puritans originally left England to come to America in 1630 because they wanted to get rid of catholic practices, but they did not wish to separate from the English Church, the Puritans wanted to make changes to the religion. King Charles would threaten the Puritans with punishments if they did not obey the church of England, so the Puritans looked for freedom in America (The Pilgrims and Puritans Come to America). John Winthrop led many Puritans to America to form the Massachusetts Bay Colony (PBS). More information about the conflict between John Winthrop and Anne Hutchinson can be found at http://www.encyclopedia.com/people/philosophy-and-religion/protestant-christianity-biographies/anne-hutchinson.

The colonists believed that if they obeyed John Winthrop’s laws God would protect them. I think that in this case John Winthrop served as almost a dictator in the sense that he was taking over how the religion is run when he left where he was before to have a pure catholic religion that was not influenced or corrupted by European church. The resemblance between John Winthrop and a dictator is slim but it is still visible. John Winthrop leads his Puritan colonists to believe that if they obey him they will as a result have protection from God. This is something that a dictator would do to gain power over people and have control. Even though John Winthrop is a “Puritan” he still did just as a dictator would do by not letting his people be exposed to outside beliefs. In this case the outside beliefs were ones of Ann Hutchinson. By banishing Ann Hutchinson and her family from Providence John proved himself to be controlling and showed that he possessed traits of a dictator.

Ann Hutchinson was the first colonial woman to change history. Some of what Ann went through during her trial is similar to what women undergo in America today. John Winthrop, like many men today, did not like that an independent woman was challenging him. During trial Winthrop said that Ann is being charged for sedition because she is “seducing” his Puritan followers by sharing her religious beliefs with them, which he said was something “not tolerable in the eyes of god nor fitting your (her) sex” (PBS). John Winthrop didn’t have any valid reasons for charging Ann Hutchinson besides the fact that she was sharing her religious beliefs that were different from the Puritan religion with the colonists. Similar to today, women like Ann Hutchinson often are pushed around by men like Winthrop that discriminate against women based on their gender. Regardless of whether they have strong and valid beliefs or ideas they (women) are still looked down upon in the workforce and in various settings because of their sex. Ann Hutchinson did not back down to Winthrop, she kept challenging him asking him “what laws have I broken” after he rambles on about her seducing his Puritan colonists by holding religious meetings at her house. Because Ann did not back down to the man that was trying to overpower her (Winthrop) she is the first women to change history in the sense that sex does not matter and all gender’s opinions and views should be heard regardless. To learn more about Ann Hutchinson’s life during and before the trial occurred visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KMllFouri0c.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Colonial History Fall 2016. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s