A Short Trip Across the Pond for Robert Frost

From 1912-1915, Robert Frost picked up his family and life in New England and moved to England in order to learn about and perfect his poetry. It was a sort of mental escape for him where he could get a change in scenery and refresh his mind for future works. Frost believed that he had mentally fallen into a rut with his writing while staying in New England. The decision to move to Engla00935060.JPGnd was a sort of last chance for him to change his perspective on writing and rejuvenate his ideas for literature. As he spent more and more time in England with his family, Frost made friends with many other authors and poets. One of these such friends was Ezra Pound. More of a mentor than a friend, Ezra Pound gave Frost many tips and instructions on how he could improve his work and stay motivated as a writer. After a while however, the two authors’ relationships fell apart and Robert Frost desired to return to New England. Also, Frost and his family were forced to return to the United States as World War I had just broke out. Nevertheless, Robert Frost gained much from his short time spent in England and as a mentee to Ezra Pound. In 1915, Robert Frost and his family returned to Ns6eigtJYew Hampshire to restart their lives again. As it is seen here with Robert Frost, sometimes all an author needs are a break from their lives and a change of scenery in order to produce great work again.

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This entry was posted in American poets, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Honors English III, Poetry and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to A Short Trip Across the Pond for Robert Frost

  1. 18milanghosh says:

    I like how you viewed Frost’s move to England as a change of scenery. This seems to be a major turning point in his career that I did not know. Were there any poets other than Pound who helped Frost develop his style, and how did they do so? I think it would be interesting to examine Frost’s poems before and after his departure to England to evaluate the effects of his short trip.

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