Category Archives: American Literary Studies

Let’s Curate Digital Assets for Colonial Literary History

Religious leader Anne Hutchinson arrived in the New World from England on this day in 1634. https://t.co/1oQk9CrwX1 #apush pic.twitter.com/pZ2QkV1mZl — AP for Students (@APforStudents) September 18, 2017 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsLet’s start collecting digital assets that will enhance our study of colonial literature. … Continue reading

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Let’s Use PBS Documentary to Guide Colonial Literature

PBS Frontline’s God in America helps us appreciate the Puritan way of life exhibited in Geraldine Brooks’ Caleb’s Crossing and will help us get ready to read John Winthrop’s sermon “A Model of Christian Charity.” Let’s have you just view … Continue reading

Posted in 21st Century Learning, American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic | 12 Comments

Caleb’s Crossing as Threshold to American Literature

Geraldine Brooks’ Caleb’s Crossing will help our introduction to American literature. While there are many voice and location to begin an American literature course, this historical novel may help us appreciate the colonial invasion from the Native American point of … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Colonial Literature, English III | 3 Comments

Let’s Use Malcolm Gladwell’s Podcast to Introduce Kate Chopin’s The Awakening

Malcolm Gladwell examines the story of this famous painting to begin his podcast. Below is an image of Calling the Roll After An Engagement, Crimea, better known as The Roll Call. I used the image from Wikipedia; it is an 1874 oil-on-canvas … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Design Thinking, Podcast, Reflective Assessment | Tagged | 4 Comments

Massasoit and the Key Relationship

The natives of North America have always played a huge role in American history. They were living in the land a while before the incoming settlers, dating back to 12,000 years when they first crossed North America. Therefore, when people … Continue reading

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White Pine Trees’ Influence in the Revolution

In colonial America trees were a very important resource. Trees provided colonists with many different kinds of fruits and nuts, the sap from maple trees was the colonists primary source of sugar besides honey, and trees even provided colonists with … Continue reading

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Collaborating on Colonial History

We’re off to a good start in creating our own history of Colonial America for our year-long focus on American literature and American literary culture. The following authors present important points about coming to terms with understanding a history of … Continue reading

Posted in 21st Century Learning, American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, English III, Trees | 16 Comments

Biblical Serpents in American Literature

The Bible tells the first installment of the story of the human race, and from the very beginning, humans have had to deal with temptation. In the Bible, a snake personifies the Devil, who in turn personifies temptation, and Adam and … Continue reading

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Biblical Allusions – Trees

“The Garden Test” from Genesis Chapters 2-3, or the story of Adam and Eve, is one of the most iconic Bible stories. It is the story in Eve is tempted into eating from it by the serpent, before giving it … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Biblical Allusions 2016, Honors English III, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Women Contradicting Cultural Norms

Anne Bradstreet contradicted the cultural norms in American literature during the 1800s. She did this by taking her consolation not from theology but from her many “wondrous works,” (pertaining to all that she has written), as she wrote, “that I … Continue reading

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