Category Archives: American Literary Studies

Let’s Use Malcolm Gladwell’s Podcast to Introduce Kate Chopin’s The Awakening

Malcolm Gladwell examines the story of this famous painting to begin his podcast. Below is an image of Calling the Roll After An Engagement, Crimea, better known as The Roll Call. I used the image from Wikipedia; it is an 1874 oil-on-canvas … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Design Thinking, Podcast, Reflective Assessment | Tagged | 4 Comments

Massasoit and the Key Relationship

The natives of North America have always played a huge role in American history. They were living in the land a while before the incoming settlers, dating back to 12,000 years when they first crossed North America. Therefore, when people … Continue reading

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White Pine Trees’ Influence in the Revolution

In colonial America trees were a very important resource. Trees provided colonists with many different kinds of fruits and nuts, the sap from maple trees was the colonists primary source of sugar besides honey, and trees even provided colonists with … Continue reading

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Collaborating on Colonial History

We’re off to a good start in creating our own history of Colonial America for our year-long focus on American literature and American literary culture. The following authors present important points about coming to terms with understanding a history of … Continue reading

Posted in 21st Century Learning, American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, English III, Trees | 16 Comments

Biblical Serpents in American Literature

The Bible tells the first installment of the story of the human race, and from the very beginning, humans have had to deal with temptation. In the Bible, a snake personifies the Devil, who in turn personifies temptation, and Adam and … Continue reading

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Biblical Allusions – Trees

“The Garden Test” from Genesis Chapters 2-3, or the story of Adam and Eve, is one of the most iconic Bible stories. It is the story in Eve is tempted into eating from it by the serpent, before giving it … Continue reading

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Women Contradicting Cultural Norms

Anne Bradstreet contradicted the cultural norms in American literature during the 1800s. She did this by taking her consolation not from theology but from her many “wondrous works,” (pertaining to all that she has written), as she wrote, “that I … Continue reading

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Create a Compelling Claim for the Best AP Prompt

Just to let you know that the technology department in the Crowsnest has a pulse on the hip culture, enjoy this new trailer about a “faithful” rendition of Hawthorne’s novel, The Scarlet Letter. Then settle down and click on the link … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, AP Mindset, Reflective Assessment | Tagged | 11 Comments

Enjoy Russell Shorto’s Great Thesis About Searching Deeper for New York’s Dutch Roots

Russell Shorto’s four part video highlights key passages of his great book, The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America. Enjoy part one to help you launch … Continue reading

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Great Information Wrapped Inside This Human Struggle

Please view this EdPuzzle for which I did not make any questions. I just want to help you find a topic for this colonial unit where I am asking you to step up and become an American literary critic. https://edpuzzle.com/embed/m/55f9b2dd595a772936a046a4Continue reading

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