Category Archives: Becoming an American Literary Critic

Let’s Curate Digital Assets for Colonial Literary History

Religious leader Anne Hutchinson arrived in the New World from England on this day in 1634. https://t.co/1oQk9CrwX1 #apush pic.twitter.com/pZ2QkV1mZl — AP for Students (@APforStudents) September 18, 2017 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.jsLet’s start collecting digital assets that will enhance our study of colonial literature. … Continue reading

Posted in 21st Century Learning, American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Colonial Literature, Twitter | Leave a comment

Let’s Use PBS Documentary to Guide Colonial Literature

PBS Frontline’s God in America helps us appreciate the Puritan way of life exhibited in Geraldine Brooks’ Caleb’s Crossing and will help us get ready to read John Winthrop’s sermon “A Model of Christian Charity.” Let’s have you just view … Continue reading

Posted in 21st Century Learning, American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic | 12 Comments

Caleb’s Crossing as Threshold to American Literature

Geraldine Brooks’ Caleb’s Crossing will help our introduction to American literature. While there are many voice and location to begin an American literature course, this historical novel may help us appreciate the colonial invasion from the Native American point of … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Colonial Literature, English III | 3 Comments

A Short Trip Across the Pond for Robert Frost

From 1912-1915, Robert Frost picked up his family and life in New England and moved to England in order to learn about and perfect his poetry. It was a sort of mental escape for him where he could get a … Continue reading

Posted in American poets, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Honors English III, Poetry | Tagged | 1 Comment

Collaborating on Colonial History

We’re off to a good start in creating our own history of Colonial America for our year-long focus on American literature and American literary culture. The following authors present important points about coming to terms with understanding a history of … Continue reading

Posted in 21st Century Learning, American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, English III, Trees | 16 Comments

Water and Literature

The story of The Flood in Genesis is used as a motif throughout literature. The motif of water deals with cleansing and rebirth. The story states that God caused a flood to rid the Earth of all of Humanities’ sins … Continue reading

Posted in Becoming an American Literary Critic, Biblical Allusions 2016, Honors English III | Leave a comment

Into the Wilderness

Uncultivated, uninhabited, and inhospitable are some of the words people typically use to describe a wilderness, but in literary terms wilderness can have quiete a different meaning. It can be associated with words such as transformation, self discovery, and growth. … Continue reading

Posted in Becoming an American Literary Critic, Biblical Allusions 2016, Honors English III | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Biblical Allusions – Trees

“The Garden Test” from Genesis Chapters 2-3, or the story of Adam and Eve, is one of the most iconic Bible stories. It is the story in Eve is tempted into eating from it by the serpent, before giving it … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Becoming an American Literary Critic, Biblical Allusions 2016, Honors English III, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Garden Test

Gardens in the Bible serve as a symbolic setting in which an important test occurs, leading to an eventual loss of innocence. Gardens in the Bible are highly symbolic in and of themselves, as they were meant to represent the … Continue reading

Posted in Becoming an American Literary Critic, Biblical Allusions, Biblical Allusions 2016, Honors English III | Leave a comment

Hartford Witch Trials: The Beginning of an Era of Hysteria

The Salem Witch Trials which primarily took place during 1692-1693 are a very well known time in colonial America. However, most people are not aware of the hysteria that consumed society in Hartford, Connecticut in 1662, 30 years prior to … Continue reading

Posted in Becoming an American Literary Critic, Colonial Literature | Tagged | Leave a comment