Category Archives: Colonial Literature

Hartford Witch Trials: The Beginning of an Era of Hysteria

The Salem Witch Trials which primarily took place during 1692-1693 are a very well known time in colonial America. However, most people are not aware of the hysteria that consumed society in Hartford, Connecticut in 1662, 30 years prior to … Continue reading

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The Ancient Burial Ground in Harford Stands as a Good Model for our Burial Ground

The Ancient Burial Ground in Harford Stands as a good models for our Burial Ground. Perhaps the most moving monument is the African American gravestone near the east side of the burial ground, just next to the steps of the … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, American Studies, Colonial Literature, English III, Honors English III, Old Center Cemetery, Service Learning | Tagged | Leave a comment

The Lighthouse Tour at Peoples State Forest

This trail in Peoples State Forest is another reminder that colonial artifacts can be just off any nature trail in the state of Connecticut. The signs along the trail are very informative as they point out parts of the community, … Continue reading

Posted in American Studies, Archaeology, Colonial Literature, Connecticut River Valley History, Local History, Native Americans, Nature Trails, Old Center Cemetery, Service Learning | Leave a comment

Valley Falls Park Trails, Vernon, Connecticut

photo, a photo by bsullivan35 on Flickr. There are 8.5 miles of blazed trails in Valley Falls Park, and the most interesting section exists at the bottom on of a wheel chair accessible trail that colonial and 19th century archeological … Continue reading

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Colonial Literature paragraph

Although it was very those days complicated there was one thing  that was really important for American people back then – the faith in god. There is a stereotype that America was the land of religious freedom that’s why lots … Continue reading

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Roger Williams

Roger Williams was one of the most well known English Protestant Theologians of his time. He grew up in Anglican England and had a change of faith after attending Cambridge, becoming a Puritan. Thus, he went against the norms of society … Continue reading

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Olaudah Equiano

Olaudah Equiano was a counter-counter culture figure in the late 18th century. Olaudah Equiano was a very unique person because, although he was once a slave, he earned his freedom, and even learned to read and write. He was fortunate … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Colonial Literature, Honors English III, Slavery | 2 Comments

Sarah Kemble Knight

Sarah Kemble Knight was an important figure in not only 18th century literature, but also in the early stages of feminism. She used sophisticated, intellectual language when writing about her journey from Boston to New York. Though she was petrified … Continue reading

Posted in American Literary Studies, Colonial Literature, Feminism, Honors English III | 2 Comments

Ben Franklin

  The part of volume A that grabs my attention the most that deals with what we are talking about now is Ben Franklin’s part.  With Ben Franklin he described 13 different things to relate to man in following the … Continue reading

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Interesting Documentary on Olaudah Equiano

Olaudah Equiano has a very compelling story to tell.  Olaudah was a slave during the 1700’s who travelled from Africa, to the West Indies, and then to America undergoing the harsh slave life.  While dealing with this difficult life, Olaudah … Continue reading

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